A World of Fun!

Hello everybody!

I hope all of you are well and reading us from the safety of your home! 🙂

As you can see, this is not the post that was due today (the last part of the interview and job hunting series). This is because, due to the current health emergency in our country, we have decided to run a series of posts that help our students to keep learning English even though we can’t go back to our school yet 😦 . Focusing on a different range of levels in each post, we will provide you with some ideas and tell you about free resources you can check and use to review what we have learnt to keep practising your English skills.

So, let’s get started, shall we? Scroll down!

Today we’re going to dedicate the post to our kiddies! We are so proud of them for staying home all these days that we think they need to play a little now! How about some games in English to practise vocabulary?

Today we’re going to tell you about an amazing app that you can download both on Android and iOs and that will entertain your kids for hours while reviewing vocabulary and learning new words in English. It’s called “Word Fun World”. Press here to go to the website with the info to download the App.

The app is really intuitive and 100% kid-friendly, of course. The first time you open it you’ll see an island with different areas, each one with a different vocabulary focus:

  • Sports and Leisure
  • Animals
  • Family and friends
  • Home
  • School
  • Body and health
  • Food and drink
  • Time
  • World around us
  • Work
  • Clothes and colours
  • Places and transport

The first games of each section start at Pre-A1 (Starters) level but every time you successfully pass a round, new words are added to the game and the difficulty increases up to A2 level (Flyers and KEY). It is, therefore, a perfect app for all levels to review the vocabulary your children have learnt so far and to help them reinforce and gain new skills, such as identifying letters and sounds or learning how some words are written.

We’re looking forward to seeing our kiddies again and having fun with them in the school but, until then, keep practising!

See you in our next post with more ideas to keep your English up! Until then, #stayathome #staysafe

 

 

 

We’re back!!

Hello everyone and welcome to the 2018/2019 course!! Continue reading “We’re back!!”

False friends

Hello everyone!

Today we’re going to talk about ‘false friends’, words in English that, given their similarity with Spanish ones, are often confusing for students. Let’s start with, probably, the most common false friend:

Sensitive vs Sensible

When students want to say ‘Sara es muy sensible’ they often write ‘Sara is very sensible’. However, it should be written ‘Sara is very sensitive’ as ‘sensible’ in English  means sensata/o.

Now, take a look at the following list of words in Spanish, how would you say them in English?

  1. Decepción
  2. Embarazada
  3. Actualmente
  4. Asistir (a un evento)
  5. Estar constipado
  6. Librería
  7. Carpeta
  8. Carrera (universitaria)
  9. Largo
  10. Simpático
  11. Terrorífico
  12. Fábrica

The correct answers are:

  1. Disappointment
  2. Pregnant
  3. Currently
  4. Attend
  5. To have a cold
  6. Bookshop
  7. Folder
  8. Degree
  9. Long
  10. Friendly
  11. Terrifying
  12. Factory

Notice the difference between the correct word and the false friend:

  1. Disappointment vs Deception (engaño)
  2. Pregnant vs Embarrased (avergonzada/o)
  3. Currently vs Actually (en realidad)
  4. Attend vs Assist (Ayudar)
  5. To have a cold vs To be constipated (Estar estreñido)
  6. Bookshop vs Library (Biblioteca)
  7. Folder vs Carpet (Alfombra/moqueta)
  8. Degree vs Career (Carrera/trayectoria profesional)
  9. Long vs Large (Grande)
  10. Friendly vs Sympathetic (compasivo)
  11. Terrifying vs Terrific (genial, fantástico)
  12. Factory vs Fabric (tela/tejido)

 

Now that you know the difference, fill in the gaps with the correct word:

  1. Jamie is ___________ studying a __________ in Biology.
  2. It is a ____________ way from Coruña to Barcelona.
  3. I’m going to the _____________ to study because it is quieter than in my house.
  4. Sara is a very __________ person, everyone likes her.
  5. Insidious is a ____________ movie, I was really scared when I watched it
  6. Please, don’t forget to take your __________ at the end of the class.
  7. Are you going to ___________ the meeting?
  8. Silk is said to be the softest ___________
  9. Losing the game was a huge _______________
  10. I am going to stay at home today as I have a terrible __________

How did it go? Scroll down to check your answers at the end of the post!

Remember that you can also follow us on:

Facebook (Euroschool of English Coruña and The Red Lobster)

Twitter (Euroschool of English Coruña)

G+ (Euroschool of English Coruña)

and our website! (www.euroschoolofenglish.com)

 

Have a great January everyone!

 

  1. Jamie is CURRENTLY studying a DEGREE in Biology.
  2. It is a LONG  way from Coruña to Barcelona.
  3. I’m going to the LIBRARY to study because it is quieter than in my house.
  4. Sara is a very FRIENDLY person, everyone likes her.
  5. Insidious is a TERRIFYING movie, I was really scared when I watched it
  6. Please, don’t forget to take your FOLDER(S) at the end of the class.
  7. Are you going to ATTEND the meeting?
  8. Silk is said to be the softest FABRIC
  9. Losing the game was a huge DISAPPOINTMENT
  10. I am going to stay at home today as I have a terrible COLD

 

British Council (Part 1)

Hello everyone!

Today we have something really interesting for you, we are going to talk about the British Council.

What is that? Most of you must be wondering. Well, exactly! That’s why we have asked our teacher Chris Hurling to explain.

Some of you may not know Chris so a brief introduction is in order: Continue reading “British Council (Part 1)”

The Passive Voice (Part 2)

Hello everyone!

Last January we wrote a post about the passive voice (you can check it out here) but we told you that it was part 1! So today we are going to take a look at 2 other types of passives (usually for Intermediate students and above) which can be quite tricky to master.

Let’s take a look at the following active sentence: Continue reading “The Passive Voice (Part 2)”

Learning English through play

Hi everyone!

How did those question tags go? Check your answers here:

Answers

And as for the extra challenge….

Continue reading “Learning English through play”

Internet slang

Hello eveybody!

HRU? What do you think our renewed website and blog? Judging by your hits on the site it must be pretty cool, eh?

Well, FYI, pretty cool new things are going on at Euroschool! Everybody is B2W and I promise you will soon know about them but, meanwhile, let’s take a look at some internet abbreviations, shall we? 🙂 Continue reading “Internet slang”

Each step counts

Hi folks!

How’s the weekend going? I hope you have enjoyed our quiz on idioms in the previous post, our students surely have! And as promised, here are the answers: 1B, 2A, 3A, 4C, 5A, 6B, 7C, 8A, 9A, 10B, 11A, 12C.

Today we have a post about the younger students, our kiddies. Carol Banet (Head of Junior Department) has written the following article to shed some lights on the YLE exams, why they are becoming so popular and her experience when students prepare and take these exams. Enjoy!

How many times as a teacher or as parents have we asked ourselves ‘How can I motivate young children to study English?’ ‘What can be done to maintain their interest?’ ‘How can they be motivated?’ ‘What about making the time spent at school more enjoyable and entertaining?’

Cambridge Young Learner exams can be one of the ways to answer these questions.

What are Cambridge Young Learners exams?

Cambridge Young Learner exams are tests specially designed for children at primary and lower- secondary school. These tests are an excellent way to motivate our students to learn English, build their confidence using a foreign language and  show parents the progress the students make.

Why should students take Young Learners exams?

These are not the classical tests students normally do at their schools. These are activity- based tests which focus on putting into practice English for everyday situations, covering familiar and interesting topics for the students specially designed to develop the skills students need to communicate in English as a second language in a natural way.

Tests where the most important thing is not what students cannot do but what they can do!

What level are the exams?

There are three levels: STARTERS, MOVERS & FLYERS. All of them designed so students improve their English following a well planned, interesting syllabus. These exams are aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

The exams are divided into three parts, covering all language skills appropriate to each level: Reading & Writing, Listening & Speaking.

What do students get after doing the exam?

All students will receive an award. They will be awarded a Cambridge Certificate which will show a number of shields, according to the student´s performance in the different parts of the exam.

Personally speaking, I really think that this is an excellent way to motivate students to see how they can make the study of a subject something more interesting, enjoyable and practical. Soon students at this early age will not be afraid of taking exams and they will see them as something natural and normal in their education. Parents would be surprised if they knew how many times students who have done one of the tests are asking when they will be taking the next.

Written by Carol Banet

Pronunciation (-ed )

Hey guys!

How are you doing? In Euroschool we couldn’t be happier!!! We have been awarded with the Achievement Award 2016!!!

Do you know what that means? Well, in case you missed it last year, this is an award given by Cambridge English to the best Exam Preparation Centres. We are top notch! 🙂 And the best part is that it is not us saying it: it’s Cambridge! So before getting hands on with pronunciation we want to thank YOU: this wouldn’t have been possible without all your effort to pass.

Here’s the award:

PRONUNCIATION:

-ed pronunciation is usually an issue to students of all levels so, today’s post is going to be dedicated to helping you with this matter.

The first thing you need to understand is that the pronunciation of these endings is going to depend on the last sound of the word without the suffix. (If you are not familiar with the phonetic chart, check out this link: https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/phonemic-chart )

For example:

“Watch” is pronounced /wɒtʃ/ and its last sound is /. This means that when adding the -ed suffix it will sound like this: /wɒtʃt/. You can see that a /t/ sound has been added at the end.

“Love” is pronounced /lov/ and its last sound is /v/. So in the past and past participle forms it will sound like this: /lovd/. Here, a /d/ sound has been added.

“Lift” is pronounced just as it is written: /lift/, with a final /t/ sound,  and in its -ed form is pronounced /liftid/

/t/, /d/ or /id/?

As mentioned above that will depend on the last sound of the word which  we know is sometimes difficult to identify. However, we have made this chart in which we categorise those sounds depending on the pronunciation of the -ed suffix.

(Please note that these are not phonemic symbols but an approximation of how they sound when we pronounce them)

/t/ /d/ /id/
/p/

/k/

/f/

/s/

/sh/

/tch/

/ks/

/b/

/g/

/v/

/z/

/dj/

/m/

/n/

/r/

/l/

/t/

/d/

This chart works not only for verbs but for any other word with -ed ending.

I know that phonetics are not very popular amongst Spanish students but I really encourage you to learn them! Your teacher at Euroschool can help you! Meanwhile, if you want to start digging around on your own, here is a great video to get started:

YouTube – British Council Phonemic Chart

As students, we usually think that our pronunciation has to be spot on and that we should know how to pronounce every word. We tend to put a lot of pressure on ourselves! Well, maybe the following video will help you to be a bit more relaxed about it!

Check it out! It’s just hilarious! 😆

<a href="http://www.slideshare.net/EuroschoolOfEnglish/slideshelf“>http://www.slideshare.net/EuroschoolOfEnglish/slideshelf

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Deconstructing sentence transformation

Hello everyone!!!!

Today we have a very special post prepared by our Director of Studies about sentence transformation but, before that, you need the answers for the passives exercises, don’t you?  How do you think you did? Let’s take a look! 😉

Exercise 1:

1.- The game has been won by Manchester United

2.- The last piece of cake was had/taken by Mark and Kevin

3.- An umbrella is being carried by Jane

4.- My book has been stolen (we omit the agent)

5.- The police are being phoned by my neighbours.

Exercise 2:

1.- A message will be sent…

2.- … ball was kicked over the…

3.- … had clearly been broken…

4.- … have been met by…

5.- … being repaired by the technician…

And now… Welcome to the world of sentence transformations!!! Enjoy!!! 🙂

Deconstructing Transformations

Transformations can be found in various different Cambridge examinations and, for many students and candidates, they represent one of the greatest challenges in Use of English. One reason for this is that many transformations test not only a particular grammar point, but also vocabulary. Although the word limit differs, the same basic technique can be applied to FCE, CAE, CPE and to some extent, PET.

Technique: Deconstructing a transformation

Steps:

1. Read the instructions. Across the levels, the instructions are the same; complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first, using the word given (except PET, where no word is given). What changes is the word limit:

PET 1 – 3 words

FCE 2 – 5 words

CAE 3 – 6 words

CPE 3 – 8 words

Remember, a contraction (e.g don’t / he’s) counts as 2 words.

2. Read the original sentence in this example.

What is the time reference (past / present /future)?

Example: They are building a new supermarket in the town centre

(FCE) BEING (word given)

A ………………………………………………………….. in the town centre.

Answer: present.

3. Compare the 2 sentences. Underline the words which appear in both.

They are building a new supermarket in the town centre

BEING (word given)

A ………………………………………………………….. in the town centre.

By doing this, you focus on what exactly needs to be changed, ‘..are building a new supermarket..’

4. Compare the order of the words in both sentences. If the order differs, why do you think this is? In the example, the transformation does not begin with the subject pronoun ‘They’, but with the article ‘A’. This would suggest a passive form.

5. Look carefully at the word given. What kind of word is it?

BEING (_ing form of the verb ‘be’)

Could this be the first word you need to write? ‘A BEING……..’

No. This would not make sense in the context of this transformation, but why not?

The article ‘A’… means a countable noun is probably required. Is there a countable noun in the original sentence?

Yes: ‘…a new supermarket..?

Is the adjective ‘new’ necessary?

In any transformation, if you are not sure whether to include the adjective or not, check the word limit. If it can be used without exceeding the word limit, use it. Remember step one: the second sentence must as similar as possible as the first sentence.

A new supermarket …………………………………. In the town centre

6. Look again at the word given: BEING. Can this word be used next? No, but why not?

Which auxiliary verb is needed to form a continuous tense?

Answer: is/are was/were

Remember step 2: time reference (in this case, present) = is/are

Is there a singular or plural reference? (in this case singular; ‘A new supermarket…) = is

A NEW SUPERMARKET IS BEING………………..in the town centre

By this point, 4 words have been used. If you have managed to get this far, you will know that this is a passive sentence so what is missing is a past participle. The original sentence uses the verb in its continuous form ‘building’. Is the verb ‘build’ a regular or an irregular verb?

Answer: irregular = BUILT

A NEW SUPERMARKET IS BEING BUILT in the town centre

This answer would receive 2 marks.

At FCE / CAE / CPE, each transformation is worth up to 2 marks. This means that if you have part of the transformation correct, you can still receive 1 mark. You do not lose marks for writing an incorrect answer, so always write something, using the word given, after all, 1 mark is better than 0!

Good Luck.

Andy (DOS)

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